Three Common Myths About Personal Injury Attorneys Dispelled

Many people go their whole lives without needing to contact a personal injury attorney. But for millions of Americans, lawyers can help them receive adequate compensation after they've been hurt. Because hiring a lawyer isn't something that people do all the time, there are still many myths about how it works.

Myth 1: Just Speaking to a Lawyer Is Expensive

A common stereotype about lawyers is that they charge clients each time they discuss a case, but this simply isn't true. Many lawyers use different fee structures, and the outcome of a case will often affect the size of a lawyer's fee.

Personal injury lawyers commonly use a contingency fee structure—they agree to work on a case for free, and if they win or get a settlement, they deduct a fee for their services. In any case, the majority of lawyers will not charge a potential client for a consultation.

Myth 2: People Who Have Insurance Don't Need a Lawyer

Being adequately insured is a great way to protect oneself against the financial burdens of personal injury or wrongful death cases. However, because insurance companies mostly care about their bottom lines, many people end up paying a great deal of money out of pocket, even if they're not at fault. Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association reports that private insurance companies cover 50 percent of car accident costs, while victims pay about 26 percent.

Additionally, insurers often raise their premiums after a wreck. That's why personal injury lawyers are essential for helping people receive fair compensation after an accident.

Myth 3: Personal Injury Lawyers Are Only for Major Injuries

Some car crashes may seem minor at first, especially if there's minimal damage to the car. However, delayed car accident injuries, such as whiplash, might not be noticeable until days later. The costs associated with these deceptive injuries can quickly add up, especially if they have chronic effects. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the initial cost of an average ER visit can total $3,300. If the victim is hospitalized or needs additional treatments, their expenses can escalate to $57,000 over the course of their lifetime. Reaching out to a personal injury attorney shortly after an accident can help prevent people from having to deal with the stress of paying medical bills for years.

If you're in legal limbo, having an experienced personal injury attorney review your case may save you time and money. When you contact Smith Shanklin Sosa, a licensed attorney will answer your call. Call us at 225-223-6333 today for a free consultation.